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so, so the big question is how would he know all that? he spent more than 20 years in the navy. he worked in the intelligence field. he was a submarine warfare specialist. he had not only a top secret clearance, but also authorizes for what's called special access, which limits the amount of people who can view highly sensitive material. he had that access. he hadn't been out of the navy for more than a year when fbi agents started tracking him and set up this sting and this undercover operation, and that's how they caught him. >> we know if there was any classified information that was actually released? >> reporter: no. there were never actually any real russian agents, so to speak. these were all undercover agents, b it is very, very serious. i mean, the navy will almost always tell you exactly where their carriers and surface ships are located in any given moment. they never reveal the location of the submarine. that is a highly classified part of the u.s. navy. he faces life in prison if he is convicted of this charge. >> wow. okay. chris, thank you. appreciate it. >>> photogr
doesn't. >>> the army and navy are using some extraordinary new camouflage technology that can make troops disappear. here's cnn's chris lawrence. >> well, wolf, the army could soon be making a decision on its next generation of camouflage. but i've got to tell you, you won't believe where this technology is headed. >> camouflage can be the difference between a soldier getting shot and going home. so lots is riding on the next generation design to outfit troops. it's only been eight years since the army spent $5 billion on m camo that critics say didn't fool anyone. soldiers complained to the point where the army abandoned its one size fits all universal pattern. so they were looking for camouflage they can use everywhere? >> correct. and it didn't work anywhere. >> reporter: guy cramer is one of the designers competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital
finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how did you source that story. >> katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a filmmakerer? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly tried to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went wrong here. >> reporter: congressman peter king, chairman of the house homeland security committee first called for
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